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Putting the A in STEAM: Interactive Mural

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If your teen patrons/students are anything like the ones in my library, you probably have a group of teens who are into anything tech and then you have a group of teens who sit and draw for hours.  All of your tech teens are planted behind a computer coding and 3D printing and you can’t pay your artsy teens to attend any of your tech programs.  What’s a teen library worker to do?  Combine tech and art with interactive art.

Electric Masterpiece

Time Needed: 2 hours

Materials Needed:

  1. Ask the teens to draw something that has a lot of sound.  We used an example of beach scene or a house.
  2. The touch board holds twelve sounds.  If you have one board/teen that’s great but if you only have one board for multiple teens, divide the sounds among them.  For example, we had six teens and three touch boards so each teen could have an art img_3045piece that could have six sounds.
    1. Have the teens decide what sounds they are going to incorporate before they begin drawing.
  3. Have teens draw their picture and draw their circuit lines.  The lines should extend to the border of the paper.
  4. Using conductive paint or copper tape to cover their hand drawn circuit lines. We used conductive paint. The advantage to copper tape is no drying time.
  5. If you are using the touch board: (We purchased the kit which came with paint, touch board, alligator clips, and a speaker.)
    1. Have teens find MP3’s that represent their sounds.  We used zapsplat.com for free MP3 sound effects.
    2. Insert the mini SD card the add tracks. Name each track as Track000; Track001, etc. (The touch board will provide downloading instructions.)
    3. Replace the SD card into the touch board and test by touching each number.img_3053
      1. Troubleshooting: if your touch board isn’t working:
        1. Make sure the speaker is turned up.
        2. Make sure you are using MP3’s.
        3. Turn the touch board on and off.
        4. Press the reset button.
  6. If you are using Makey Makey: (Makey Makey can only hold up to six sounds)
    1. Download Soundplant on your computer.
    2. Find sound effects. You can use zapsplat.com.  Assign the desired sound effect to the Makey Makey.
  7. Use alligator clips to connect the touch board/Makey Makey to the art piece.
  8. Touch the conductive paint/copper wire to make the art piece come alive!

Interactive Mural

Time Needed: 4-4.5 hours

Materials Needed:

  • Conductive paint
  • Drawing softwareimg_3146
  • iPads or computers
  • Cutting machine 
  • Microphone
  • Computer
  • Recording software
  • Vinyl
  • Touch board
  • Speaker
  • Flash drive plug

Please make sure you can paint on the walls before you can begin.  It’s not permanent because you can simply paint over it.

  1. Have teens draw a picture digitally.  We used iPads and the free Adobe Draw app.
  2. Use a cutting machine to turn their picture into a vinyl stencil.
    1. We used a Silhouette machine but you can use Cricut
    2. If you don’t have a cutting machine, you can have teens cut a design onto stencil material.  This requires an Exacto knife so perhaps this can be done with older teens.
      1. You can also use precut stencils and allow teens to create a mural with stencils.
  3. Press the stencil onto the wall.
  4. Paint the stencil with conductive paint.
  5. Allow 20 minutes to dry.  We used fans to speed up the drying process.
  6. Draw lines with a pencil from the stencil to the touch board.  Make sure the touch board in near an outlet.
  7. While the wall is drying, have teens record their own MP3 sounds or phrase.
    1. We used the voice recording software that came with the computer.
    2. Make sure your recorder uses MP3 files because the touch board only uses MP3’s.
      1. Our voice recorder used MPA and I had to use an online file converter to change them into MP3’s.  I used Zamzar.com.
      2. Assign the sounds to a number on the touch board. Make sure the numbers/circuits won’t cross lines on the wall.
  8. When the stencil is dry, peel it from the wall.  Pick out the insides.  We used the pick 20161217_114434utensil that came with the Silhouette.  You can probably use tweezers.
  9. Use conductive paint or copper tape to make your circuits.  We used copper tape because there’s no drying time and it was easier to connect to the touch board.
  10. Mount the touch board.  We used Command strips.
  11. When you mount the board, it will be raised from the wall and won’t touch the copper tape to complete the circuit.  I put copper tape on top of touch board. It looks messy but it will work every time.
  12. Test your circuits!
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Faux Screen Printing

screen-printing-3Graphic Tees are very popular because it’s a way for teens to express who they are, their fandom, or their favorite band.  DIY graphic tees are a great way to turn consumers into producers.

Curriculum:  art, graphic design, career exploration

Budget: $10-$300

Expensive/Advanced Faux Screen Printing 1

 

Materials: Silhouette Cutting Machine, vinyl, fabric paint, t-shirts, Adobe Illustrator Draw app

If you have a larger budget or you own a cutting machine (doesn’t have to be a Silhouette), screen printing can be a fairly easy project.

  1. We had teens design a picture with the free Adobe Illustrator Draw app.
  2. Teens emailed their design to staff.
  3. We uploaded their design to the Silhouette software and printed it on adhesive vinyl.
  4. Teens placed the vinyl on the shirt and sponged fabric paint over the stencil.
  5. When it dries (use fans to speed up the drying process), teens pealed off the vinyl stencil.

screen-printing-2To make this a career exploration program, talk to the teens about logos/branding.  Have teens create their own company and ask them to design a logo for their new company.

Faux screen printing can be a program in graphic design for all skill levels by teaching the Adobe Illustrator app.

Expensive/Advanced Faux Screen Printing 2

Repeat steps 1 & 2.  Instead of cutting on vinyl, cut on stencil material. To give teens real life experience of screen printing, you can purchase a screen printing board.  This does get a little messy but messy is fun, right?

Intermediate Faux Screen Printing

If you don’t have a cutting machine, you can purchase stencil material on Amazon.  Teens can draw their design on the stencil and use an Exacto knife to cut it out.  Tape the stencil on the shirt and sponge fabric paint.

Easy Faux Screen Printing

If your library has a die cut machine, pre cut shapes or letters to use as stencils.  You can also purchase stencil designs.

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Murder Mystery: Death at a Slumber Party

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The Cast

We have found that teens love murder mysteries so that’s why we do one every year.  To keep it fresh, we do a different type of mystery every year.

There are several advantages to a murder mystery program.  They are incredibly cheap to host.  You can purchase a kit but if you have the time to write your own scripts, you can save a lot of $$$.  Our murder mysteries run between $50-$100 and this is food and supplies.

The Script

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Tiffany & the jealous bestie

Teens like to perform and chances are you have thespians among your regular teen members.  Get your teens involved in the writing process.  We either have one teen write the entire script on Google Docs or invite teens to assist.  Once we have the script completed, we get our teen cast together and give them a script and tell them to learn all their lines.  We made the script open to improve so that teens didn’t have to learn their lines word for word.  This takes the pressure off to be perfect. We have a dress rehearsal two hours before the event because teens are busy and flaky and if you have too many rehearsals, you are running the risk of no shows.

 

 

The Theme

By the title, you can tell that this year’s theme was a slumber party.  This was during the

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Tiffany & the hot jock BF

time that the TV show Scream Queens was on air so we wanted to capitalize on the trend. We presented it like a real slumber party thrown by the stereotypical popular mean girl, Tiffany Van Luxe.   The cast included the hot jock boyfriend, the emo sister, the jealous best friend, the creepy neighbor, and the wannabe.  The activities were that of a traditional slumber party including hide and seek, truth or dare, make overs,  and lip sync battle.

Promotion

We had our main character, Tiffany, come in costume a couple of weeks prior to the event to shoot promo pics and videos.  We then promoted the event with her pics on our social media accounts.  We also asked our other cast if we would take an image of them from their social media to use as posters to place around the library.  The post featured their face and a tagline that asked if they were the murderer.

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#TiffanyTakeover

We snail mailed invitations that resembled a real slumber party invites to all our regulars.  Mailed invites are where we always get the majority of our attendance.

We had a book display promoting the event with the preverbal “chalk” outline in the stacks.

During dress rehearsal, we took pics that could be motives.  These pics were put on Instagram through out the party.  During the party, we told teens to check our Instagram account for clues.

Tiffany Takeover.  We had “Tiffany” take over our Instagram for the week with her snotty comments and pics.

During the party, we told teens that if they take a selfie with Tiffany and post it on their social media, she would give them candy.  This is a great way to spread the word about your parties through teens.

The Party

murder-myster-14Of course teens were encouraged to come in PJs by announcing that the best PJs would win a cash prize.  We of course rigged the contest so that our mean girl host chose herself (Yes this was a bit mean but also funny).

After we figured most teens were in attendance, we welcomed them by introducing the cast and their bios.  We told them that from now until the end of the party, the cast would be in character and that one of them is going to murder Tiffany, the host.  Their job is to pay attention and to try to guess the murder and the motive.  We also told them to check our Instagram for a vital clues through out the party. (This is a great way to get teens to check/follow your social media account).

The party began with dancing.  The cast went around to all the guests in character.  I

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Bro Overs

included a link to our script at the end of this post.  We then did all the activities listed under “theme” and Tiffany was murdered during the lip sync battle by a someone in costume just like Scream Queens.  Teens were then given a sheet of paper asking them to name the murderer and the motive.

Evaluation

One group guessed the murderer but not the motive because as you can guess, teens were caught up in the party and not paying attention to the clues.  Even though no one technically go it right, which no one ever does at our murder mysteries, they still had a great time.  Check out our script on Google Docs.

Most popular activities: hide and seek and truth or dare.

Attendance: 28 teens and a budget of $60

Food served: donuts, potato chips, and flavored water and Tiff Clique Punch.

 

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All Cons Don’t Have to be Comic

 

whocon7Comic Cons are all the rage but who said you have to limit a con to comics?  You can taylor any con to your demographic.  If you have a large community of writers, you can host a NovelCon.  If you have a community of filmmakers, you can host a FilmCon.  If you have a community of fanboys/fangirls, you can host a FandomCon.  We have a lot of patrons who are into Doctor Who so we hosted a WhoCon.  The possibilities are endless.

 

 

Why a Con?

Cons are popular nationwide and they aren’t limited to comics.  There’s GeekyCon for Harry Potter fans and VidCon for Youtubers but these cons are usually in large metropolitan cities and can be very expensive.  Bringing the con experience to your library provides free fun for the entire family.

The Pros of Cons

The great thing about the term is that you can attach “con” after any word and patrons will instantly know what type of program you are offering.

Cons have the potential to attract new patrons to your library.  Many people still believe the library is only for checking out books and being quiet.  Holding a MinecraftCon, BakerCon, CraftCon, or a DroneCon will bring in different citizens and will ultimately get you new cardholders.

whocon5
Waiting on their Gallifrey Button

When you attract new patrons and cardholders, you can promote all your special services and collections.

Con Activities

Con means convention so patrons expect to see a variety of activities including crafts, cosplay/costume contests, games, and prizes.  Cons can be as long as you want.  Some cons are the typical two hours and some cons last two days.

  • You can invite local business and organizations that fit your theme.  If you know you’ll have hundreds of patrons, you can have business rent tables and proceeds can go to prizes.
  • Balloon artists and face painters are always a big hit at any event.  They can be costly but it’s a crowd pleaser.
  • Photo booths are also very popular.  You can pay to rent a photo booth from a local company.  This can cost $300 and up but the company does all the work and patrons leave with a picture of your event with your library name and social media contact info.

 

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An Evening with Van Gogh
  • Artist Alleys are usually found at comic cons but if you have any type of artsy or fandom based con, you can include an artist alley.  An artist alley is a cluster of tables where local artists sell their work.  Once again, you can have artists rent a table and it can go towards a prize.
  • Food.  You don’t have to have food especially if your library is surrounded by restaurants.  The drawback to no food is that patrons might leave to eat.  You can ask a local food truck to park outside your library, you can ask for sponsors from local restaurants, you can use table rental proceeds towards pizza.  We usually ask our local boy scout troop to provide hot togs and chips.  Boy scouts usually come with a license to serve food and they do every thing which is great.

 

Challenges of the Con

  • The greatest challenge will probably be your administration and staff.
    • You may have to do a lot of convincing to your board and administration to host a large library-wide con.  Your best argument is that it will attract new patrons and cardholders.  It can also get your library in the newspaper if you invite your local press to take pictures- free advertisement!!
    • Hosting a con takes a village and getting several staff on board can be daunting. The staff most likely to help are the ones who are fans of your theme.  Look for the geeks.
    • A con takes lots of planning and this can also be exhausting.  If you are interested in hosting a con, make sure you have lots of time and patience.

WhoCon

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As I stated earlier, we have a large community of Doctor Who fans.  How do I know this?  During our regular school visits, we asked teens to fill out a short survey.  We listed every popular fandom including Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Supernatural, and anime/manga and we asked teens to circle their favorites.  Doctor Who was the most popular after Harry Potter.

Activities:

  • Life Size Guess Who-We printed out Doctor Who characters and played the game like the board game version.
  • An Evening with Van Gogh-Recreating a Starry Night with the TARDIS-Participants had to recreate the Starry Night painting from the Van Gogh episode.
  • Gallifrey name buttons-We used a name converter website and made the conversions into a button.
  • Green Screen Photos-Participants chose between two preselected pictures to use as
    whocon8
    Green Screen

    their background.  Their pictures were printed for them to take home.

  • The Silence Scavenger Hunt-We hid pictures of The Silence all over the library.  Participants received a five-clue sheet and were told to take a selfie with each Silence they found.  They showed the activity leader their five pictures to receive Jelly Bellies.  You can also have teens tally their arm for every Silence they find for added affect.
  • Doctor Who Trivia with Kahoot-We created two 20 question trivia games on Kahoot.
  • 10 Different Ways to Wear a Bowtie Craft-Simple bowtie craft with felt.  Participants were given key chain holders, earring backs, and pin backs for crafting.
  • Costume Contest -A picture was taken of all participants.  All other program goers were encouraged to vote with stickers.

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The most popular activities were the Gallifrey buttons, Kahoot, and An Evening with Van Gogh.

Stats:  75 participants, $120

For more information on Cons, please visit our 2016 ALA Annual Presentation

 

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LEDs

LEDs are a simple, cheap, and fun programs for grades 3-adult.

We use LEDs to teach teens about  how they are used in the world around them and circuitry.

Tip- Many teens do not know how to hand sew so you’ll have to teach them how to tie a knot, how to do a running stitch, and how to close a stitch.

EASY – LED Origami ($100 for 20 teens)

Materials: Origami paper, LEDs, tape, scissors, coin battery (We purchased batteries, and LEDs from Adafruit)

We found origami videos on Youtube and set out iPads.  We found that it’s easier for teens to follow origami on video than in a instructional booklet. We did a heart origami and showed teens how to insert the LED in the fold of the heart with tape.

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Intermediate-LED Hoodie & Backpack ($60 for 20 teens)

Materials: Hoodie, thread, needle, EL Wire

Have teens bring in a hoodie.  Have teens begin sewing the EL wire on one side of the zipper.  They should sew the wire in small increments all the way around the hoodie to the other side of the zipper.  They should then cut a small hole on the inside of the pocket on the side with the slack.  String the slack through the pocket, connect the battery pack and that’s it.

You can use hot glue on the EL wire.  The backpack was made but hot gluing the wire.  This also looks cool on baseball caps.

Intermediate-LED Wristbands ($75 for 20 teens)

Materials: Felt or fabric, conductive thread, LED, snaps, coin battery (We purchased everything except the fabric from Adafruit)

Please see the diagram from instructables.

When teens snap the wristband shut, the LED should come on.

led-wristbands

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Turning the Teen Room into a Makerspace: Week 7

Last time on Turning the Teen Room into a Makerspace: Week 5 & 6, we played with our new toys and our maintenance staff was assembling the furniture.

Now that you’re caught up:

The furniture is finally assembled and now it time to arrange the room.  Here’s how we arranged The Hive:

IMG_2708

 

Since we have an overwhelming demographic of artistic teens, half of the makerspace is dedicated to art.  The paintings on the wall were created by our staff member who also teaches our weekly art classes.  We will add teen created artwork to the wall.   The letters were purchased at Walmart

 

We have all types of artsy supplies.  Supplies include watercolors, all types of pencils/markers, plain/graph/comic paper, and coloring sheets.  There’s an art notebook for teens to fill pages.  The shelving unit was purchased at Ikea.

There’s a dry erase wall from floor to ceiling.  If you are able, I suggest investing in a dry erase wall-teens love it.  I’ve seen comic strips and a list of their favorite bands that took up the entire wall. It’s great for passive activities such as polling, listing faves, or program suggestions.

We hung a guitar for teens to remove on their own and play.  The guitar hanger and pick holder was purchased on Amazon.

There’s pillows and rugs for teens who like to create/make on the floor.  We have clipboards available for use.  We will also have a quarterly anthology where teens can submit their short stories, poetry, and artwork.  Our Creative Writing Club will organize and assemble the anthology for teens to look through while their in the room.

For the techy side of the room, we mounted three iPads.  You are able to restrict adding and removing apps, and getting on the internet.  We want to encourage teens to explore apps and not watch videos on Youtube or check in on Facebook so we restricted our iPads. iPad mounts were purchased from Amazon.

The Silhouette pictured is old and our new more awesome cutter will arrive any day now!!  When it arrives, it will be housed on this table.  I talked about the cutter and the certification in my previous post.  See the above link.

Our 3D Printer is the Lulzbot and we purchased the cart on Amazon.  Once again, teens will be required to be certified before they may use it.  We set up an account through Tinkercad and Projectignite.autodesk.com.  You can have teens set up accounts with your email, set up lessons, and track progress.  Teens can log on anytime, at the library or at home, take five hours of lessons and then we will teach them how to send their designs to the printer. Once they are certified, they can print on their own.

This shelf contains robotics and maker crafts such as Ozobots, rubber band looms, and Lego Mindstorms.

We have two tables down the center of the room for making.  We covered the tables with chalkboard paint.  Tables were purchased at Ikea.

We have a book for each piece of equipment we own so that teens can learn on their own during open lab.  We also have crafting books in the art corner.  The books are reference books and they will stay in the room.

DISPLAYS

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We are trying to stay away from paper flyers because they take up valuable table space.  To alleviate this, we have dry erase boards on the walls and a large screen in the front of the room.  All digital flyers are created on Canva. Canva is great because you can set your own dimensions to fit any screen.  The screen will feature upcoming events, completed projects, and a leaderboard of teens who complete challenges.  We have a sign outside the door displaying what’s going on in the room for the week.

 

FOR THE STAFF

Yay, storage!  We kept our TARDIS because it’s a storage shelf that looks like a TARDIS. In it, we keep supplies that need to be replenished and techy equipment that only comes out on special occasions such as the Google Cardboard and the Makey Makeys.

The other cabinet stores our Chromebooks and iPads.

DECORATION

As you can see, we don’t have a lot of decoration on the walls.  We have two painted guitars. The teens massacred the strings so we just removed the strings and turned them into wall decor.  And the only other thing we have is a clock.  We plan to fill the walls with teen created artwork.

 

We open Tuesday, September 6th and we’re excited for all the new amazing projects our teens will create.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at dabron@zblibrary.org or leave a comment below.

 

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Turning the Teen Room Into a Makerspace: Weeks 5 & 6

Previously on Turning the Teen Room Into a Makerspace Month 1, we removed all the old furniture, ordered new furniture, and planned September.

Now that you’re caught up…

New Furniture

It has been a slow week by way of furniture.  Our maintenance department is responsible for the assembly but they have been moving rather slowly so we only have two new tables in our room.  We purchased most of our tables from Ikea and the great thing about Ikea is that they make extendable tables.  We have four extendable tables that can accommodate four to six people.  Often times we plan a program for ten and fifteen show up.  That’s the beauty of these table, you don’t have to have haul in more tables, just extend it.

Playing With New Toys

Makerspaces always incorporate technology and if you are like us and don’t know how to use anything, you have to teach yourself before you can teach others.

We took a couple of hours every day to sit down and teach ourselves how to use the Ozobots, Makey Makey, Silhouette cutting machine, Google Cardboard, and wearable LEDs.

Ozobot-This is a small bot that you code with color. The bots are $50 each and all you need is paper and chisel tipped markers (red, black, blue, green).  You can code the bot to spin, speed up, turn left, etc.  It’s great for all ages and all levels.

Makey Makey-Use everyday items and turn them into game controllers.  The kits are $50 each. It sounds basic and beginner level stuff but you can make life size games by turning people into the controller.  Once you get the hang of it, you and your teens can have lots of fun.  Check out the videos on the Makey Makey site.  This is our favorite.

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Silhouette Cutting Machine

This machine can range in price depending on the machine you want.  The Cameo 1 and the Portrait (pictured below) cost $220 and $179 respectively.  The Cameo 1 looks fancier but they do the same thing so purchase the Portrait if you’re on a tight budget.

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These machines cut paper, vinyl, fabric, and stencil material.  You can make any decal your heart desires.  For example, one of my teens wanted a vinyl decal of the Mockingjay symbol to put on her cell phone.  Of course this is copyright infringement but I copied the image from Google Images, uploaded it to the Portrait, and cut it out.  I don’t have a picture but it looks like she purchased it in a store.  You can use the machine to make stencils for logo/t-shirt graphics, you can cut fabric to sew on clothes/pillows, etc.  In the picture below, my co worker likes jackolopes.  She drew it in the Silhouette software and cut it out using the machine.  As you can see, teens can design their own pictures. Designing in the software can be difficult (It took my coworker Elise about an hour) but you can have teens design in Adobe (we the used Adobe Illustrator app on the iPad) and they can email it to you and you can upload it to the Silhouette software.  I designed a TARDIS this way.

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New advancements to Silhouette:

  • You no longer have to move the cutting machine to a computer to print.  You can download the new software to create a cloud. Teens can save to the cloud and can print from one connected computer.
  • You can purchase the Cameo 3, coming in September, that will be Bluetooth!  No wires needed!!
  • If you subscribe to Adobe Suite or Corel, you can design there and send your designs through the cloud.

Google Cardboard

Google Cardboard costs $15 each.  They are VR (Virtual Reality) goggles made out of cardboard.  You download free apps or purchase apps and insert the smart device into the goggles.  This is by far cheaper than all other VR goggles and does a great job for the price.

You’ll have to purchase iPods, have your teens use their own phone, or trust teens with your phone.  That is the drawback.  Google Cardboard says it can hold any device 4-7″ and the video below was used with an iPhone 6S.

LED Wearables

We obtained our ideas from Adafruit.  Beware, Adafruit is a tough website to navigate.

September will focus on LEDs.  See our programming section further down to view our curriculum for the month.

We taught ourselves Chibitronics, coin battery LEDs, and lastly Gemma (programmable LED through Arduino). If all those words scared you, don’t worry; it sacred us too.

Superhero Logo

Processed with MOLDIV
Easy LED Wearable

LED Circuits

This craft was made with the above battery holder and snaps to complete the circuit.

Gemma

Gemma requires sewing and programming.  You have to download the software from Adafruit.  We couldn’t download to our work computers because of the firewall so I had to bring my personal Macbook.  All you have to do is copy/paste the code from Adafruit.

In the video, the LED is blinking fast and I coded it to blink slower.  You can add several LED sequins and code it to blink however you like. Adafruit’s Youtube channel is full of wonderful ideas.

September Programs

Nectar Collective September

Mondays & Wednesdays-LED workshops that include Chibitronics, LED superhero logos, LED origami and cityscape, LED Hoodie using EL Wire, and Gemma hats.

Tuesdays-Appy Hour.  Teens will lean how to make videos using Magisto and Stop Motion. Teens will create animation using Animator

Thursdays-Creative Writing Meetup.  This is a teen led creative writing group.

Thursdays-Let’s Draw Something.  Teens will learn different drawing/painting techniques or they can free draw.

Saturdays-Open Lab.

Monthly Challenges-There will be a new challenge every month.  All the materials will be set out and teens will be given minimal instructions.

Makerbees-This is basically a frequent maker card-Makerbees level 1.  There will be five activities that teens can complete.  Levels increase in difficulty as teens complete them.

3D Printing-Teens will have to be certified before they may use the 3D Printer.  We set up a teacher account on Tinkercad.  Teens must complete 5 hours of lessons and take a class with staff before they may print on their own.

Silhouette Cutting Machine-Teens will have to be certified before they may use the cutting machine.  To become certified, teens must attend two workshops.

That’s all for the past two weeks.  Next week we will hopefully have our furniture assembled and we can get our room ready.  We will also learn how to screen print.  The Hive is supposed to open on September 6th but it’s still a construction zone and I don’t think that will happen.

 

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Turning the Teen Room Into a Makerspace: Month 1

In May 2015, we turned our computer lab into a teen room and we were excited!  All the usual suspects were there: gaming, crafting, dry erase wall, lounge furniture, pub tables and chairs, and computers.  We were averaging about 500 teens a month.

THE BEFORE

Why are we changing in just over a year?  We found that our teens weren’t using the room as it was intended.  Teens were using it as a hang out and hanging out is fine but when it incites fighting and bullying, we had to find a solution.

Our solution, mostly our director’s solution, was to provide a space that encouraged teens to engage in constructive activities.  Simply placing Little Bits on a table was not enough to  get their attention but hosting month-long workshops with Little Bits may get their attention.

hive 4

THE TRANSITION

So our journey began in Mid July and the makerspace is slated to open September 6th.

Month 1:  Finding Furniture on a Budget.

We were given $3000 for furniture and since one table costs $3000 from Demco, we turned to Ikea and Worthington Direct.  Ikea’s wood tables are pretty  sturdy so that’s what we purchased from Ikea and we kept our Demco chairs from the old teen room (Always get library grade chairs).

We decided on tables, chairs, mounted iPads, and shelving to hold crafting and maker tools as our room layout.  We will have raised tables for people who like to make while standing. We will have shorter tables for small groups and picnic style tables with benches.

What Equipment Should We Get?

Once again we have a modest budget of $5000 so we chose to focus on coding, 3D printing, and circuitry.  Here’s our list of equipment. (Please note-we already owned a 3D printer)

* Little Bits     * Snap Circuits     * Ozobots      * Sphero     * LED     * Makey Makey

* Google Cardboard      * Lulzbot     * Screen Printing     * Raspberry Pi     * Makedo

*  Lego Mindstorms     *Arckit

 

Programs

We will have themed months and September is Electricity. We decided to do activities everyday to cut down on the “I am doing something” but they’re really just scribbling on a piece of paper and being loud.

Branding

Our room is called The Hive (our high school/town mascot is a bee). Our programming is called the Nectar Collective.  We are planning a brochure to send to schools, we will make a monthly activities calendar to give to patrons who use the room, and we’ll get some business cards for community/school visits.

NECTAR COLLECTIVE heading

This has been a long and exhausting month.  The teen room remained open and the summer reading club was in full swing during the entire planning process so that added to the pressure but my co worker and I tried to come to work with the realization that we are going to start the school year with a new room.  We will be able to provide educational yet exciting programs to our teens.

Next week: Repainting the room and assembling the furniture.

 

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Bon ApeTeens: Salsa & Smoothies

Bon ApeTeens is a series that teaches teens how to make no-cook snacks.  This month, teens learned how to make salsa and smoothies.

Budget- $30-$75

  • We borrowed blenders from staff.
  • Give teens a variety of ingredients to include in their salsa and smoothies.
  • Have teens take their desired ingredients to their station and give them safety kitchen scissors to chop/cut their fruits/vegetables.
  • Allow teens to operate the blenders.
  • Teens should be responsible for cleaning the blender between uses, their stations, and their utensils.

Other Options

  • Have teens make their own recipes as they make their salsa and smoothies.
  • You can use the extras to have a tasting of other recipes.
  • Turn it into a competition and have staff judge the finished foods.